We can trust the label

Sometimes press releases are published that suggest that the information on the energy label does not cover the reality. In 2016, for instance, one of these articles claimed that every fifth label was making false data, and manufacturers misled consumers regarding consumption data.

If we read this, we will be very annoyed, because who loves to be deceived or stiffed.

So the question is - can we trust the energy label?

First, look at the article in question (it can be found in many places and forms on the Internet, it’s up to the Reader to find it)! If we read it thoroughly, it turns out that it was not a Hungarian, but a survey conducted in other EU countries. Within the survey a total of 26 (!) appliances were tested. There was nothing about the selection criteria or the testing process, in the article. Is this a representative sample, a credible statistic?

Numerous representatives of the Hungarian press and the media have published the article in a literal translation without any admonition, as if it were actual and true in Hungary. There was only one exception, and as a sign of our appreciation and gratitude let us name the one - István Domokos from Rádió Napközben of Kossuth Rádió was the only one who asked CECED Hungary about the situation, what is true what is not, what should we know, and can the domestic consumers trust the labels.

To answer this question, we would like to provide you some useful information below.

Manufacturers shall indicate the information to be displayed on the energy label on the basis of measurements made in a manner specified in law and in certain standards. These measurements, in order to make comparisons between the indicated information on the devices, must be carried out in a uniform, standardized manner.

CECED Hungary and the international organization of CECED have a clear view that every manufacturer must comply with the legal requirements and must declare real information as every consumer has the right to receive correct information from the manufacturers.

The CECED Hungary and the international organization of CECED are committed to strengthening market surveillance and to publicizing the results.

Consumer protection authorities regularly check whether the information on the devices sold in stores is in accordance with the reality. The table below shows the results of the recent consumer protection inspections in Hungary:

 

2011

 

 

 

 

Inspected appliance

Number of inspected types

Energy rating error (%)

Consumption value error (%)

 

   

 

refrigerators and freezers

522

0

0

 

   

 

washing machines

379

0,5

0,3

 

   

 

dryers

31

3,2

0

Source: http://fogyasztovedelem.kormany.hu/jelentesek (the table is based on the data of the previous NFH website)

 

2013

 

 

 

 

Inspected appliance

Number of inspected types

Energy rating error (%)

Consumption value error (%)

 

   

 

refrigerators and freezers

835

0,24

0

 

   

 

cookers

384

5,73

5,73

 

   

 

washing machines

647

0

0

Source: http://fogyasztovedelem.kormany.hu/jelentesek (the table is based on the data of the previous NFH website)

 

2014

 

 

 

 

Inspected appliance

Number of inspected types

Energy rating error (%)

Consumption value error (%)

 

   

 

dishwashers

295

0

0,34

Source: http://fogyasztovedelem.kormany.hu/jelentesek (the table is based on the data of the previous NFH website)

 

2015

 

 

 

 

Inspected appliance

Number of inspected types

Content non-compliance (%)

 

   

 

refrigerators and freezers

4639 types of products altogether

0,9

 

 

 

cookers

2,46

 

 

 

washing machines

0,82

Source: http://fogyasztovedelem.kormany.hu/jelentesek

Thus, we can see that the domestic consumer protection authorities are doing pretty thorough checks and the error percentages are extremely low (in fact, they do not even approach the "every fifth" error rate, which is 20%).

But control and testing programs are also taking place at EU level, with the cooperation of national consumer protection authorities. Example of such programs is the ATLETE (appliance testing for energy label evaluation). In this program, first the refrigerators’, and then, during a later campaign, the washing machines' energy labels were examined in terms of adequacy of the information displayed on them. The procedures and results can be viewed at www.atlete.eu.